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JOHN NEWTON CHAMPION
page 584

was born near West Springfield, massachusetts, may 29, 1797. After completing his education, he taught school for some time in the State of New Jersey. he afterward removed to Savannah, Georgia, and entered into mercantile business with his elder brother. He was married, December 29, 1831, to Sarah Ann Chadbourne, daughter of Captain Jacob Chadbourne, of Newburyport, Massachusetts. He emigrated to Ohio in 1835, making the long voyage by sea from Savannah to New York, and thence to Columbus by stage and canal. Here he opened a large dry goods store, under the firm name of Champion & Lathrop. He was a large stockholder in the Buckeye and Exchange blocks, which were built in 1838, and were indeed "enterprises of great pith an moment" in that day. He also built a large and elegant brick residence on the southeast corner of High and Long streets, the present site of the Commercial bank.

He and his young wife were soon looked up to as among the first in social circles; and such was his political influence, that his house became almost the headquarters of the Whig leaders. His business was prosperous and enabled him to make investments in large tracts of real estate, which ultimately became very valuable. He died at Columbus, August 23, 1845, respected by all who knew him.

His wife was a leading member of the charitable societies of the city, and, during the war of the Rebellion, acted as a ward visitor in relieving the wants of the soldiers' families. She died in the same city where most of her life was spent, August 30, 1873, aged sixty-one years, lamented by a large circle of friends, and by many of the poor and lowly whom her benefactions had relieved.

Mr. and Mrs. Champion left three sons and one daughter--all yet living--as follows: Reuben Ely and Aaron Burt, residing in Cincinnati; and John Newton, and Isabella C. (now Mrs. Godman), residing in Columbus.

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HON. WILLIAM T. MARTIN
page 584

was born April 6, 1788, in Bedford county, Pennsylvania; was married in 1814, to Amelia Aschom; and, in spring of that year, migrated to Columbus, where he resided till his death--February 19, 1866.

Like so many other Columbian pioneers who became prominent in business and politics, he came to the city as a mechanic, his particular trade being that of carpenter and joiner. He also united with this occuppation [sic.] those of teacher and merchant. He held many public offices, which we have not time here to enumerate, the last being that of associate judge of the court of common pleas, in 1851.

In 1858 he published his "History of Franklin County," a very valuable compendium of pioneer history, written in a plain and unpretentious, but often very pleasing, style. He was remarkable for the evenness of his temper, his charity for the faults of others, and for his great liberality to the poor. He died greatly regretted by all classes of citizens. His widow, who still survives, resides with a daughter, now Mrs. Smithson E. Wright, of Cincinnati. His son, B. F. Martin, well and favorably known as a lawyer and justice of the peace, resides in Columbus.

NOTE: The Martin family is buried at Green Lawn Cemetery, Columbus.

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