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JOSEPH RIDGWAY, JR.,
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was born in Staten Island, New York, April 23, 1800. His father, Matthew Ridgway, died while Joseph was in his early childhood, and he went to reside with an uncle, after whom he had been named, and who was then residing in Cayuga county. This uncle was afterward a member of congress from Ohio. His nephew received an excellent education in one of the new York academies, making a specialty of the science of engineering, for which he had a great fondness. In 1820 he came to Ohio, with his uncle, and settled in Columbus. For several years he devoted himself to his favorite pursuit, being employed as an engineer on the canal which was then in process of construction. Later, he became a partner with his uncle in a foundry at Columbus, established for the manufacture of a cast-iron plow, of which the elder Ridgway owned the patent. This plow marked an era in Ohio agriculture, and the "Ridgway foundry" was the pioneer in the Columbus iron manufacture, which has now become so important a branch of industry.

Mr. Ridgway threw his entire energy into the Ohio railroad, becoming one of the principal stockholders and a director of the Columbus & Xenia road--one of the oldest in the state. It was to furnish this road with rolling stock that he established a car factory at Columbus, and he was secretary of the company at the time of his death, which occurred August 23, 1850. In 1844, and again in 1846, he was a member of the Ohio legislature--first in the senate, and afterward in the house of representatives. He was also, for several years, a member of the board of State house commissioners.

He died greatly regretted, having been identified with almost every movement having in view the welfare of his adopted city.

He was married, November 28, 1828, to Jeannette S. Tatem, daughter of Charles Tatem, of Cincinnati.

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DR. LINCOLN GOODALE
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was born in Worcester county, Massachusetts, February 25, 1782. His father, Nathan Goodale, was an officer in the Revolutionary war, who, coming west, settled, first at Marietta, in 1788, and afterward at Belpre. There he was captured by the Indians, in 1794, and died near Sandusky, to which place the Indians were taking him in hope of obtaining a ransom.

Dr. Goodale having studied medicine at Belpre, settled in Franklinton, and entered upon the practice of his profession, in 1805. In 1812 he volunteered his services in the war which had just broken out, and was appointed by Governor Meigs, assistant surgeon in McArthur's regiment. He was taken prisoner at the time of Hull's surrender, and sent to Malden with wounded men. Being released, he returned to Franklinton in October, having been in the service less than a year. Removing to Columbus in 1814, he entered upon that successful career as a merchant which he followed for more than thirty years, and in which he acquired great wealth. His death occurred April 30, 1868, in his eighty-seventh year. Several years before his death, he gave to his adopted city the beautiful park with which his name will be forever identified.

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